All Types Of Diamond Cuts: A One-Read Guide

Author: Jewepiter Team

What makes a diamond sparkle? The answer is not the color, clarity, or carat weight of the diamond, but the cut. 

The cut of a diamond is the way it is shaped and polished to reflect and refract light. The cut of a diamond can make or break its beauty and value. That’s why, as a jewelry seller or business, you need to master the art and science of diamond cuts. 

This post will give you a complete guide to all types of diamond cuts and help you enhance your jewelry portfolio and customer satisfaction.

Pear Cut Diamond

Pear Cut Diamond

The pear cut diamond is a combination of round and marquise cuts, and like other fancy cuts, it comes in many different proportions.

The pear cut diamond is also known as the teardrop cut, which was created by diamond polisher Lodewyk van Berquem in the early 14th century.

In addition to creating the pear cut diamond, he is also responsible for the placement of facets in modern diamond cutting and the use of symmetry in the diamond cutting process.

Without him, diamonds could not be cut in a way that maximizes their luster and brilliance.

Radiant Cut Diamond

Radiant Cut Diamond

Since the 1980s, the radiant cut has been the first rectangular shape with a complete brilliant facet pattern, and it is also one of the most faceted and brilliant diamond cuts.

The original radiant cut was invented by diamond cutting master Henry Grossbard in 1977.

He knew that many people liked the emerald cut, but felt it was not shiny enough, so his ultimate goal was to combine the best features of the emerald cut and round cut into one diamond cut to release the full potential of diamond luster.

Eventually, he perfected the modern radiant cut diamond in 1981.

Cushion Cut Diamond

Cushion Cut Diamond

The cushion cut diamond, as the first most popular shape, has been around for nearly 200 years.

Cushion cut diamonds seem to have a modern design style, but their history can be traced back to the 19th century. At that time, square and rounded diamonds were known as mine cuts after being mined in Brazil, and later, when diamonds were discovered in South Africa, this cut mine was known as the old mine.

Some experts believe that modern cushion cut diamonds not only come from old mine cuts like Table, Peruzzi Candlelight, but also have a great influence on modern cushion diamond cuts.

Asscher Cut Diamond

Asscher Cut Diamond

The Asscher cut diamond is one of the most popular diamond cuts for minimalist jewelry enthusiasts.

The name of the Asscher cut diamond originates from the I.J.Asscher Diamond Company, which was established by Joseph Isaac Asscher in the Netherlands in 1845, and the Asscher cut diamond was created by the founder’s grandson in 1902.

To prevent duplication, the Asscher cut diamond was also the first diamond cut to be patented.

Emerald Cut Diamond

Emerald Cut Diamond

With its long lines and eye-catching mirror effect, it is highly praised. Its unique shape is known as the step cut, with a narrow and clean table.

Although the emerald cut diamond is considered modern, it is one of the oldest diamonds, with a history dating back to the 16th century.

The emerald cut was originally made for emeralds, and because of its large crown and deep pavilion, it can enhance the richness of color.

The emerald cut also reduces the pressure during the cutting process, while reducing the loss of the gem.

Oval Cut Diamond

Oval Cut Diamond

The oval cut diamond is one of the most brilliant fancy diamonds. If made into a diamond ring, it can make the fingers slender and beautiful. Compared with other fancy diamonds of the same grade, it will appear larger.

Its history can be traced back to the 13th to 19th centuries when it was described as oval in literary works.

The modern oval cut diamond was created by Lazare Kaplan in 1957, who had already mastered the cutting skills before this.

At that time, he was even ridiculed and looked down upon by other diamond cutters, until he created the modern oval cut diamond and greatly improved its luster, his talent was fully recognized by the industry.

Heart Cut Diamond

Heart Cut Diamond

The heart cut diamond is the most romantic and unique shape, which is very popular in weddings because it symbolizes love.

The history of the heart cut diamond can be traced back to the end of the 14th century when it was regarded as a symbol of royalty.

The heart cut diamond was first mentioned in a conversation between Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza of Milan and Nicodemo in 1464.

In 1562, Lady Mary of Scotland gave Queen Elizabeth a ring set with a heart-shaped diamond. At that time, the heart-shaped diamond was considered a symbol of friendship and kindness between the royal families, which is one of the most famous heart-shaped diamonds in history.

Princess cut Diamond

Princess cut Diamond

The princess square cut diamond is one of the most popular fancy diamonds, favored for its many suitable and beautiful settings as well as its exquisite appearance features.

Its history can be traced back to the early 1960s when diamond cutter Arpad Nagy designed the “Profile cut”, which was commonly referred to as the princess square cut diamond at the time.

The true princess square cut diamond originated in 1971 when Basil Watermeyer applied for a patent for a new diamond shape and named it the Barion Cut.

The modern princess square cut diamond was created in 1981 by Betzalel Ambar, Ygal Perelman, and Israel ItsKowitz, with the aim of maximizing brightness and brilliance.

Marquise Cut Diamond

Marquise Cut Diamond

The marquise cut diamond is a diamond cut that is highly elegant and vintage in style. Its unique oval shape and pointed ends make it stand out among many diamond cuts.

The history of the marquise cut diamond can be traced back to the 18th century when King Louis XV of France commissioned a royal jeweler to design a diamond shape that most resembled the lips of his mistress, Jean Antoinette Poisson (also known as Madame de Pompadour), thus the marquise cut was born.

Over time, the shape and facet plan of the marquise cut diamond have been refined as cutters have gained a deeper understanding of the light performance of diamonds. Now, this oval shape with pointed cutting features has 56 or 58 carefully placed brilliant facets.

The symmetry of the modern marquise cut diamond is a key feature, but at the same time, it also needs to maintain good proportions. People do not want the stone to look too long, or too short and chubby. Balance is crucial.

Round Cut Diamond

Round Cut Diamond

The round cut diamond, also known as the round brilliant cut, is one of the most brilliant diamond cuts. Its round profile and 58 eye-catching facets make it the most popular among all diamond cuts, especially in engagement rings.

The history of the round cut diamond can be traced back to the mid-19th century when diamond cutters began to use more refined and complex techniques. However, it was not until the invention of the bruting machine in the late 19th century that diamonds could be cut into a perfect round shape, rather than a cushion cut. It was initially known as the European cut.

In fact, the round brilliant cut with 58 facets that we see today did not appear until 1919 when Marcel Tolkowsky published his paper “Diamond Design: Reflection and Refraction of Light in Diamonds”. Tolkowsky essentially created a mathematical formula for cutting diamonds.

Over time, thanks to technological advances, Tolkowsky’s formula has been improved to perfection. The symmetry and proportions of the modern round cut diamond are key features, designed to maximize its luster and brilliance.

Trillion Cut Diamond

Trillion Cut Diamond

The trillion cut diamond, also known as the triangle cut, is a unique and eye-catching diamond cut. Its triangular shape and brilliant facets make it stand out among many diamond cuts, especially in rings and pendants.

The history of the trillion cut diamond can be traced back to the 18th century when the Asscher brothers from Amsterdam first created the triangle cut. However, it was not until the mid-1960s that Leon Finker invented the Trillion cut that we know today.

Leon Finker’s son, Marvin Finker, entered the business in the early 1970s. He decided to apply for a patent for his father’s cut and registered the trademark “Trillion®” for their now patented triangle brilliant cut diamond.

Modern trillion cut diamonds are known for their sharp luster or fire. If the diamond is cut to the correct depth, it can produce a good sparkle. This cut is often used as the main stone for jewelry or as an auxiliary gem for rings. Although trillion cut diamonds are often used as embellishments for diamond jewelry, many customers have started to prefer to use diamonds as the center gem of their rings, because since the 1960s, the appeal of this diamond has grown exponentially.

Square Cut Diamond

Square Cut Diamond

The square cut diamond, also known as the French cut, is a unique and eye-catching diamond cut. Its square shape and brilliant facets make it stand out among many diamond cuts, especially in rings and pendants.

The history of the square cut diamond can be traced back to the 14th century when diamond cutters began to use more refined and complex techniques. However, it was not until the 1960s that a diamond cutter named Arpad Nagy perfected the square cut that we know today.

Arpad Nagy’s square cut diamond was called the “Profile cut”, which was commonly referred to as the princess square cut diamond at the time. However, the real princess square cut diamond originated in 1971 when Basil Watermeyer applied for a new diamond shape patent and named it Barion Cut.

Modern square cut diamonds are known for their elegant appearance and excellent luster. If the diamond is cut to the correct depth, it can produce a good sparkle. This cut is often used as the main stone for jewelry or as an auxiliary gem for rings. Although square cut diamonds are often used as embellishments for diamond jewelry, many customers have started to prefer to use diamonds as the center gem of their rings, because since the 1960s, the appeal of this diamond has grown exponentially.

Octagonal Cut Diamond

Octagonal Cut Diamond

The octagonal cut diamond is a unique and eye-catching diamond cut. Its octagonal shape and brilliant facets make it stand out among many diamond cuts, especially in rings and pendants.

The history of the octagonal cut diamond can be traced back to the 14th century when diamond cutters began to use more refined and complex techniques. However, it was not until the 1960s that a diamond cutter named Lazare Kaplan perfected the octagonal cut that we know today.

The shape of the octagonal cut diamond is similar to the round and Asscher cut diamonds, but with a modified hexagonal shape. This cut is an ideal choice for those who wish to attract good luck and wealth, as in Chinese and other Asian cultures, the number “8” is considered to bring good luck.

Modern octagonal cut diamonds are known for their elegant appearance and excellent luster. If the diamond is cut to the correct depth, it can produce a good sparkle. This cut is often used as the main stone for jewelry or as an auxiliary gem for rings. Although octagonal cut diamonds are often used as embellishments for diamond jewelry, many customers have started to prefer to use diamonds as the center gem of their rings, because since the 1960s, the appeal of this diamond has grown exponentially.

Rectangular Cut Diamond

Rectangular Cut Diamond

The rectangular cut diamond, also known as the rectangular cut, is a unique and eye-catching diamond cut. Its elongated shape and brilliant facets make it stand out among many diamond cuts, especially in rings and pendants.

The history of the rectangular cut diamond can be traced back to the 14th century when diamond cutters began to use more refined and complex techniques. However, it was not until the 1960s that a diamond cutter named Arpad Nagy perfected the rectangular cut that we know today.

Arpad Nagy’s rectangular cut diamond was called the “Profile cut”, which was commonly referred to as the princess square cut diamond at the time. However, the real princess square cut diamond originated in 1971 when Basil Watermeyer applied for a new diamond shape patent and named it Barion Cut.

Modern rectangular cut diamonds are known for their elegant appearance and excellent luster. If the diamond is cut to the correct depth, it can produce a good sparkle. This cut is often used as the main stone for jewelry or as an auxiliary gem for rings. Although rectangular cut diamonds are often used as embellishments for diamond jewelry, many customers have started to prefer to use diamonds as the center gem of their rings, because since the 1960s, the appeal of this diamond has grown exponentially.

Rose Cut Diamond

Rose Cut Diamond

The rose cut diamond is a unique and eye-catching diamond cut. Its shape is similar to an open rose flower, hence the name. The rose cut diamond has a flat bottom, no facets, and a dome with only 24 facets. This cut is characterized by a series of facets rising from the bottom of the diamond, forming a dome shape.

The history of the rose cut diamond can be traced back to the 16th century and is one of the oldest diamond cuts still in demand. Historians speculate that rose cut diamonds began to gain reputation in the jewelry world around the 15th century. Rose cut diamonds were most common in the Georgian era (1700s) and Victorian era (1840-1900).

Although the reputation of rose cut diamonds declined after the miner’s cut and old European cut were born in the 19th century, they were still common in Georgian and Victorian era jewelry. You will notice that in the jewelry of these periods, rose diamonds are usually set in a circle of precious metal, with the facets facing out.

Modern rose cut diamonds are known for their elegant appearance and excellent luster. If the diamond is cut to the correct depth, it can produce a good sparkle. This cut is often used as the main stone for jewelry or as an auxiliary gem for rings. Although rose cut diamonds are often used as embellishments for diamond jewelry, many customers have started to prefer to use diamonds as the center gem of their rings, because since the 1960s, the appeal of this diamond has grown exponentially.

Conclusion

Cut Shape

In conclusion, we’ve explored all types of diamond cuts in this comprehensive guide. Understanding these cuts is crucial for any jewelry seller looking to expand their knowledge and offerings. 

By understanding the different types of diamond cuts, you can make informed decisions when buying and selling diamonds for your jewelry business.

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