Basket Setting vs Prong Setting

Author: Jewepiter Team

Are you curious about the difference between basket settings and prong settings for your jewelry? You’ve come to the right place! 

In this post, we’ll explore the differences between basket and prong settings and help you decide which one to offer. We’ll cover the pros and cons of each setting style, including appearance, durability, and cost. 

By the end of this post, you’ll have a better understanding of basket and prong settings and be able to make an informed decision about which one to offer your customers.

What Does Basket Setting Mean?

Basket Setting vs Prong Setting 3

The basket setting is a distinctive version of the prong setting. It features not only the conventional prongs that ascend from the band but also includes horizontal bands. 

These horizontal elements envelop the prongs, linking them together and forming a ‘basket’. This basket serves as a secure and prominent seat for the gemstone, enhancing its visibility and stability.

These settings can range from simple to intricate, with some even featuring vintage detailing. Although a Basket setting is a type of prong setting, it can also merge with other styles. For instance, if a Cathedral setting features a basket, it can also be classified as a Basket setting.

What is the Difference Between a Claw Setting and a Basket Setting?

The claw setting, also known as a prong setting, involves four to six metal pieces that extend from the ring’s band and arch over the gemstone, holding it securely in place. 

On the other hand, the basket setting not only features these prongs but also includes horizontal bands that connect the prongs, forming a ‘basket’. This basket provides a base for the gemstone, adding an extra layer of security and stability.

Variations of Basket Settings

Basket settings in jewelry come in various designs, each offering a unique aesthetic and level of security for the gemstone. Here are some variations:

Standard Basket Setting: This is the most common type of basket setting, featuring horizontal bands that connect each prong, forming a ‘basket’ where the gemstone sits.

Curved Design: In some designs, the horizontal bar of the basket setting has a curved design that matches the rounded shape of the gemstone.

Straight Design: In other cases, the horizontal bar of the basket setting is straight.

Cathedral Setting with a Basket: This is a variation of the basket setting where the vertical prongs and horizontal bands connect to form a basket, and the band of the ring arches up to meet the sides of the setting, resembling the arches of a cathedral.

Two-Tier Setting: This variation consists of a pair of wire circles, connected by four upright prongs. It’s a simple design often used for diamond earrings.

Each of these variations can be crafted with different numbers of prongs (four, six, or eight) and can secure various cuts and types of gemstones. The choice of basket setting depends on the specific design preferences and the type of gemstone being set.

What is the Meaning of Prong Setting?

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The prong setting, also known as the prong mount, is a popular method used in jewelry design to secure gemstones. 

This technique involves the use of metal projections, often referred to as “prongs”, which grip the gemstone to hold it in place on the jewelry piece. This setting not only ensures the gemstone’s security but also enhances its visibility and brilliance.

What is Common Prong Setting?

Prong settings, typically featuring 4 or 6 prongs, are a prevalent choice for mounting gemstones in jewelry. The most common style is the rounded prong, but the beauty of prong settings lies in their versatility. 

They can be crafted into a variety of unique looks. 

Some of these include the double prong, which uses two prongs for each corner of the gemstone, and the flat tab, which provides a sleek, modern appearance. 

The claw design, available in both double claw and petite claw variations, offers a more traditional, vintage look. 

The button style is characterized by its small, button-like prongs, while the v-prong is specifically designed to protect the pointed corners of princess-cut gemstones. 

Additionally, custom-designed prongs allow for endless possibilities to suit any style or preference.

Variations of Prong Settings

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Prong settings are one of the most common ways to secure a gemstone on a piece of jewelry. They strike the balance between showcasing the table, crown, and pavilion while also protecting the gemstone from any hits or drops. 

Here are some variations of prong settings:

1. V-Prongs: V-prong settings are named after the shape of its prongs. Most prongs have a solid round or square face, but V-prongs have a slit down the middle that separates it into two parts. The notch forms a V so each side can grasp a different edge of the gemstone.

2. Round Prongs: Round prongs are the most common design. When viewed from the top, they appear like buttons holding the gemstone in place.

3. Claw Prongs: Claw prongs are another common type of prong setting.

4. Four-Prong: Four-prong settings are a popular choice for securing gemstones.

5. Flat Tab: Flat tab prongs are more square-shaped.

6. Tulip: Tulip prongs are a unique variation of prong settings.

7. Shared Prongs: Shared prongs are a type of prong setting where two gemstones share the same prong.

8. Custom: Custom prongs are designed according to the specific requirements of the gemstone and the wearer.

Each of these variations can be crafted with different numbers of prongs (four, six, or eight) and can secure various cuts and types of gemstones. The choice of prong setting depends on the specific design preferences and the type of gemstone being set.

Pros and Cons Each Setting

Both basket and prong settings offer their unique attributes, making them suitable choices for lifelong wear. But there are some specific advantages and drawbacks to each.

Most Basket settings have short prongs, which securely hold the center stone and allow it to sit almost flush with the basket. This design is less likely to catch on fabrics, making it a convenient choice. 

Prong settings, however, are often recommended for those with active lifestyles due to their robust design. If you’re seeking additional security, especially for larger stones, you might consider options with double prongs or multiple-prong designs. But remember, too many prongs may interfere with your diamond’s sparkle.

Cost Comparison

As for the cost, it’s hard to definitively say whether a Basket setting or Prong setting would be more expensive. The price of an engagement ring is largely dictated by the center stone and the karat gold used. 

However, the complexity of the design and the number of diamonds used in the setting can also influence the price. Therefore, more often than not, a Basket setting may cost more due to its intricate design and use of more metal.

Conclusion

In conclusion, both basket and prong settings have their pros and cons. Basket settings are more secure and offer better protection for the diamond, while prong settings are more versatile and allow more light to enter the diamond. 

Ultimately, the choice between these two setting styles depends on your customers’ preferences and needs. By offering both options, you can cater to a wider range of customers and increase your sales. 

We hope this post has helped you understand the differences between basket and prong settings and make an informed decision about which one to offer.

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